People go to Kanchanaburi to explore the beautiful national parks, impressive waterfalls, limestone caves and fascinating historical sites that include Death Railway and the River Kwae Bridge. This province in Western Thailand is a place of absolute beauty wrapped up in a rich cultural history. It’s definitely worth a visit.

Just 2 hours from the capital of Bangkok and you will arrive with accommodation options ranging from the luxurious X2 River Kwai Resort to the many mid-range options or cheap hostels if you are really on a budget. A quick rest and you will want to hit the tourist trail because there is a lot to see and do.

A Beautiful Place With A Sad History

Kanchanaburi was established in the late 18th century by King Rama I as a defensive outpost against possible Burmese attacks. In 1833 during the reign of King Rama III the town of Kanchanaburi was moved about 16 km to where it is now. The town overlooks the River Kwai.

A visit to The Death Railway or Burma Railway is a must for first-time visitors to Kanchanaburi. The railway was built by thousands of Allied Prisoners of War (POWs) and forced laborers

during World War II. Sadly over 100,000 laborers died from accidents, exhaustion, dysentery, infection and malnutrition during construction of the railway between 1942 and 1943.

The railway joins Thailand and Myanmar (also known as Burma). You can hire a local guide to hear in detail about how Japan took control of Burma from the United Kingdom and used the railway to supply its forces based there. 

A guided tour can also include the Bridge on the River Kwai, the Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, the Death Railway Museum and the Hellfire Pass Memorial Museum. If you are limited for time a tour is ideal. Riding the train while hearing many history lessons will be a highlight of your visit to Kanchanaburi.

If you have more time to spend in the area you can go bamboo rafting on the River Kwae, roam Khmer temple ruins, Thai temples or Chinese shrines or go shopping for some local bargains. Nature lovers will be heading to enjoy the seven-tiered waterfalls at Srinakarin Dam National Park or the famous Erawan National Park with plenty of natural beauty to see including caves and waterfalls.

Another great area is Sai Yok National Park where many locals go as well as some tourists who have time to explore. You can try a night in an authentic bungalow on the river for a true local experience. Take a dip in the hot springs after some cool cave exploring and enjoy the slow pace of life.

Or you might just like to relax in a breezy river-side cafe on Mae Nam Kwae Road to sample some local Thai food. 

The province of Kanchanaburi is the third largest in all of Thailand so you could easily spend many weeks there or make several trips with Bangkok as your base. Be sure to put it on your list of destinations not to miss. 

People go to Kanchanaburi to explore the beautiful national parks, impressive waterfalls, limestone caves and fascinating historical sites that include Death Railway and the River Kwae Bridge. This province in Western Thailand is a place of absolute beauty wrapped up in a rich cultural history. It’s definitely worth a visit.

Just 2 hours from the capital of Bangkok and you will arrive with accommodation options ranging from the luxurious X2 River Kwai Resort to the many mid-range options or cheap hostels if you are really on a budget. A quick rest and you will want to hit the tourist trail because there is a lot to see and do.

A Beautiful Place With A Sad History

Kanchanaburi was established in the late 18th century by King Rama I as a defensive outpost against possible Burmese attacks. In 1833 during the reign of King Rama III the town of Kanchanaburi was moved about 16 km to where it is now. The town overlooks the River Kwai.

A visit to The Death Railway or Burma Railway is a must for first-time visitors to Kanchanaburi. The railway was built by thousands of Allied Prisoners of War (POWs) and forced laborers

during World War II. Sadly over 100,000 laborers died from accidents, exhaustion, dysentery, infection and malnutrition during construction of the railway between 1942 and 1943.

The railway joins Thailand and Myanmar (also known as Burma). You can hire a local guide to hear in detail about how Japan took control of Burma from the United Kingdom and used the railway to supply its forces based there. 

A guided tour can also include the Bridge on the River Kwai, the Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, the Death Railway Museum and the Hellfire Pass Memorial Museum. If you are limited for time a tour is ideal. Riding the train while hearing many history lessons will be a highlight of your visit to Kanchanaburi.

If you have more time to spend in the area you can go bamboo rafting on the River Kwae, roam Khmer temple ruins, Thai temples or Chinese shrines or go shopping for some local bargains. Nature lovers will be heading to enjoy the seven-tiered waterfalls at Srinakarin Dam National Park or the famous Erawan National Park with plenty of natural beauty to see including caves and waterfalls.

Another great area is Sai Yok National Park where many locals go as well as some tourists who have time to explore. You can try a night in an authentic bungalow on the river for a true local experience. Take a dip in the hot springs after some cool cave exploring and enjoy the slow pace of life.

Or you might just like to relax in a breezy river-side cafe on Mae Nam Kwae Road to sample some local Thai food. 

The province of Kanchanaburi is the third largest in all of Thailand so you could easily spend many weeks there or make several trips with Bangkok as your base. Be sure to put it on your list of destinations not to miss.